Take My Advice by Tristi Pinkston

advice

What if the answers to life aren’t always black and white?

Jill Reed thinks she knows it all, and as the advice columnist for her high school newspaper, she gets to share her wisdom on a weekly basis. She handles questions about everything from dating to choosing the right nail polish, and with the exception of a few bullies, everyone respects her opinion.

But when life throws her some curves she can’t handle, she realizes she knows a whole less than she thought she did, and she’ll need to ask others for their advice so she can make it through.

File Size: 485 KB
Print Length: 129 pages
Publisher: Trifecta Books (November 24, 2015)
Publication Date: November 24, 2015
ISBN-10: 0996624627
ISBN-13: 978-0996624626

Purchase at:

Amazon (Kindle)

Amazon (Paperback)

Barnes and Noble

Tristi Pinkston is the author of over forty-five books in various genres and under multiple pen names. She’s the owner of Trifecta Books, has worked as a freelance editor for over ten years, and presents at writing conferences up and down the Wasatch Front. Her novel Secret Sisters was awarded with a Silver Quill by the League of Utah Writers. When she’s not editing or writing (well, let’s face it—she’s always editing or writing), Tristi enjoys watching good movies and taking really long naps. She lives with her patient husband, four highly intelligent children, and one cute little dog in the Rocky Mountains. You can learn more about her at www.tristipinkston.com.
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Interview with Ron Hutchinson, Author of Voices of Locusts

Ron-15-224x300Ron says he was an Army brat growing up, and lived all over the country, from New York to California and points in between. He began writing fiction full time at the age of 66 after a long career in journalism and public relations. Ron graduated from the University of Missouri in 1967 with a degree in journalism. He has worked as a reporter, editor, and columnist at newspapers in Texas, California, and Missouri. He was employed by a major oil company as a public relations executive, and later operated his own public relations agency. He created the board game Sixth Sense in 2003. Ron lives in Joplin, Missouri, and enjoys golf and hiking.

When did you first get bit by the writing bug?

I took my first newspaper job at the El Paso Times when I was 19. I was a big fan of Ernest Hemingway back in those days, and I thought how nice it would be to rent some isolated beach house and write for a living. It was all a pipe dream because I lacked the discipline needed to write. Still, as the years rolled past, I held onto my dream. After I retired from a career in journalism and public relations, I gave writing another try. I was 66. Not only did I now have the discipline, but I pieced together in my head a half dozen novels. My fifth novel will be published this spring.

Why did you decide to write stories for the YA market?

My life as a kid was filled with adventure—from climbing Mt. Fuji in Japan to hunting elk in Colorado—and it seemed only natural for me to write about those adventures, albeit with some literary license.

What is your favorite part of writing for this group? What is the greatest challenge?

I create strong middle-grade and YA characters, present them a conflict, then turn them loose. They map out the story—I simply goes along for the ride. The greatest challenge with middle-grade/YA stories is dialogue that rings true. A middle-grade character speaking like an adult, for example, will turn off a young reader. I strive to write middle-grade/YA dialogue that is real, and pay close attention to what is being said when I am around kids in those age groups.

Can you tell us what your latest book is all about?

Young Jack O’Brien and his family arrive at a remote U.S. Air Force outpost where Jack’s father is base commander. The year is 1948. Sixteen-year-old Jack has never felt the bittersweet sting of love, but that all changes when he has a chance encounter with Fujiko Kobaysi, a beautiful and enchanting 17-year-old Japanese girl. Jack is immediately smitten.

Fujiko’s parents are overly protective and monitor her every move, and Jack and Fujiko meet secretly at her garden, located some distance from her village. Jack is devastated when Fujiko tells him that she has been promised in marriage by her parents to an older man, a practice common throughout Asia at the time. The marriage is only months away. Jack devises a cunning plan, one that will overshadow her arranged marriage and bring Fujiko and him together.

Playing out against a backdrop of swirling post-War social change, Voices of the Locusts also tells the story of three families—one black, one white, one Asian. Told in vivid and sometimes haunting detail, Jack and Fujiko are frustrated in their romantic quest by story characters coming to terms (often violently) with the emotional scars of World War II.

What inspired you to write it?voices

Much of the story is based on personal experience from living in Japan for two years. The story took shape in my head over many years.

Where can readers purchase a copy?

Amazon. It is available as an e-book or paperback.

What is up next for you?

I just completed a crime thriller I’m calling “The Redhead, the Bookie, and the G-Man.” It should be available to purchase later this spring at Amazon.

Do you have anything else to add?

Don’t give up on your dream. Tell a story that is unique, create characters who are believable but one of a kind, and write dialogue that is crisp and full or passion.

Thank you for spending time with us today, Ron. We wish you much success.

Interview with Pat McDermott, Author of Autumn Glimmer

Pat McD Author Photo

Boston, Massachusetts native Pat McDermott writes romantic action/adventure stories set in an Ireland still ruled by the heirs of High King Brian Boru. Autumn Glimmer, a young adult paranormal adventure rich in Irish myth and packing a hefty wallop of fairy magic, is the sequel to Glancing Through the Glimmer. Both books are “prequels” to her Band of Roses Trilogy.

Pat’s favorite non-writing activities include cooking, reading, music, hiking, music, and traveling, especially to Ireland. She is a member of the New Hampshire Writers’ Project, Romance Writers of America, and Celtic Hearts Romance Writers. She lives and writes in New Hampshire, USA.

Website: http://www.patmcdermott.net/

Travel/Writing Blog (Put the Kettle On): http://pat-mcdermott.blogspot.com/

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/home.php?#!/pat.mcdermott1

Thank you for joining us today, Pat. Can you please start off by telling us a bit about yourself?

Before I do, I’d like to thank you for having me today, Cheryl. It’s a pleasure to visit The Children’s and Teens’ Book Connection. I grew up in Boston, and I miss it until I try driving down there. I currently live near the New Hampshire seacoast with my husband and three Tonkinese cats. My kids are grown, so I now have the luxury of spending my mornings writing. My grandparents came from Ireland, and the music and legends heard growing up still inspire the stories I write. When I’m not writing, I love to cook and have my own cooking blog. I also have a writing/travel blog in which I describe my visits to various places, especially Ireland.

When did you first get bit by the writing bug?

I can recall writing down stories when I was six. My family included some talented storytellers, especially my father. He made up most of his bedtime stories, and his tales often kept me awake for hours, in a good way: they made me want to make up stories too.

Why did you decide to write stories for the YA market?

I had already written the Band of Roses Trilogy when an acquaintance suggested the YA angle. I found I loved writing about my “Roses” characters as teenagers. Their romantic escapades are a tad sweeter than those of their grownup personas, but their adventures are just as exciting, thanks to the zany Irish fairies who’ve joined the cast, creating all sorts of mischief with their magical glimmer.

Both “Glimmer” stories take place in the modern Kingdom of Ireland. They star Janet Gleason, the sixteen-year-old granddaughter of the U.S. Ambassador to Ireland, and Prince Liam Boru, the seventeen-year-old son of the King of Ireland.

What is your favorite part of writing for this group? What is the greatest challenge?

I found it a joy to read dozens of YA books to get a feel for the genre, and I’m still reading them. YA is a perfect vehicle for creating imaginary worlds and devising impossible situations with happy endings. Troubled young readers can find comfort in characters with problems similar to theirs, or they can escape from the stress of growing up for a while. I’m happy to provide a story or two to help.

As for the challenge of writing YA, the biggest one for me is getting my head back in teenager mode, but only from an emotional point of view. No sense trying to incorporate fads or clothing styles, as those change too rapidly. I’m also careful to avoid using “current” American teenage slang, though I do have fun with Irish slang. It’s no botheration at all!

Can you tell us what your latest book is all about?

Autumn Glimmer reunites Janet and Liam for their second fairy adventure. It isn’t necessary to have read Glancing Through the Glimmer to enjoy Autumn Glimmer, but a touch of background wouldn’t hurt.

In Glancing Through the Glimmer, Finvarra, the King of Fairies, is unfazed by the fact that Ireland’s fairies are dying from lack of mortal belief in them. Finvarra would rather dance than worry—but he must have a mortal dancing partner.

When Janet Gleason’s grandfather/guardian becomes the U.S. Ambassador to Ireland, she must leave her American school and friends behind. A royal invitation to the Ambassadors’ Ball terrifies her. She can’t even waltz and dreads embarrassment. Finvarra’s fairy witch overhears her fervent wish to learn to dance.

Seventeen-year-old Liam Boru loathes the idea of escorting another pampered girl to a ball. In fact, he detests most of his royal duties. He dresses down to move through Dublin unnoticed and lands on his royal backside when Janet crashes into him. He asks to see her again, and she agrees. Unaware of each other’s identities, they meet for a date, and the fairies steal Janet away. Liam’s attempts to find her lead to a glimmer-fraught showdown in the dungeons of Clontarf Castle.

In Autumn Glimmer, King Brian invites Janet and her grandparents to Glensheelin, the royal family’s country estate, to celebrate Halloween. Glensheelin is Irish for “the glen of the fairy pool,” which the mortals think is a fictitious old legend. In fact, a clan of fairies still lives beneath Glensheelin’s lake, and every seventh Halloween, they must leave their watery home to collect the flowers their queen requires to keep a hungry monster asleep. This year, Blinn, Mell, and Lewy get the job. Blinn wants to see the mortal king’s house. Lewy wants to taste oatcakes again, and Mell goes along on a tragic ride that leaves poor Lewy lost and alone. Liam and Janet must help him find the flower bag before the monster awakens, but Lewy’s misguided glimmer catches the young mortals in a magical spell that threatens to trap them forever in the palace beneath the lake.

What inspired you to write it?autumn-glimmer-200x300

Why, the fairies, of course! Seriously, a trip to Ireland, specifically to the Connemara Heritage and History Centre in Galway, introduced me to crannogs, which are ancient man-made islands. I liked the idea of having one in the lake at Glensheelin. As I already had my hero and heroine, I only had to concoct a troop of water fairies and a monster. That was easy enough to do after reading several old Irish legends, most of which I found in my aunts’ spectacular collection of antique Irish books.

Where can readers purchase a copy?

Autumn Glimmer is available in e-book format from:

MuseItUp Publishing  http://museituppublishing.com/bookstore2/index.php?page=shop.product_details&flypage=flypage.tpl&product_id=654&category_id=6&option=com_virtuemart&Itemid=1

Amazon Kindle U.S. http://www.amazon.com/Autumn-Glimmer-ebook/dp/B00B5E0MS0/ref=sr_1_1?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1360330192&sr=1-1&keywords=autumn+glimmer

Amazon Kindle U.K. http://www.amazon.co.uk/Autumn-Glimmer-ebook/dp/B00B5E0MS0/ref=sr_1_sc_1?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1361408068&sr=1-1-spell

Smashwords  http://www.smashwords.com/books/view/287743

What is up next for you?

I’ve nearly completed my first contemporary romance, set—where else?—in Ireland. After that, I’ll likely start a third Glimmer book.

Do you have anything else to add?

Just to say thanks again for having me, Cheryl. I’ve thoroughly enjoyed my visit!

Thank you for spending time with us today, Pat. We wish you much success.

Interview with Janet K. Brown, Author of Victoria and the Ghost

janet (3)Janet K. Brown lives in Wichita Falls, Texas with her husband, Charles. She began writing while her three daughters were kids but did not study the craft or submit her work until she retired  in October,2005. Writing became a second career.

4RV Publishing released Janet’s debut novel, an inspirational young adult, Victoria and the Ghost, July 25, 2012.

She studies her three grandchildren for help with teen expressions and actions.

Pen-L Publishing released Janet’s non-fiction book, Divine Dining Dec. 6, 2012. It’s a 365 devotion book to Guide You to Healthier Weight and Abundant Wellness.

Janet belongs to such writing groups as ACFW, OWFI, CWFI, and RWA and continues to write short stories for teens and adults.

She and her husband love to travel with their RV, visit with family, and work in their church.

Contact Janet at:

Website: http://www.janetkbrown.com

Or E-mail: Janet.hope@att.net

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/#!/pages/Janet-K-Brown-Author/143915285641707

Twitter: https://twitter.com/janetkbrowntx

Thank you for joining us today, Janet. Can you please start off by telling us a bit about yourself?

Through the years of rearing my three daughters and supporting my husband’s success, I wrote as therapy for depression despite my busy hours. I loved my life, but because of my own choice, as with most mothers, I hid my desires and reveled in those of my family. In 2005, I realized time was passing for me to enjoy my oldest granddaughter, so I retired from my job as medical coder and bookkeeper for a pulmonary doctor and set out to enjoy grandkids and write.

I joined a local RWA chapter, studied everything they threw at me, wrote, and submitted to one publisher after another. Thank God, I improved over those first efforts, and thanks also, for Vivian Zabel and 4RV Publishing for offering me my first contract, only 6 years after I started, a proverbial short time in trying to sell your first book. God does give us the desires of our heart.

When did you first get bit by the writing bug?

I love to write. My first story came in junior high. My English teacher that year dished out more aggravation to me than to any of my fellow students. At the end of the year, she told me she did that because she saw promise in my writing. Imagine that, a little Texas girl who was so shy she trembled at walking into class every day.

Why did you decide to write stories for the YA market?

Years ago, I wrote a coming-of-age novel about a college girl. It was my princess falls for a criminal and saves him from himself piece. Victoria and the Ghost was my first teen story. I’ve always loved writing for teenagers. I think I never quite grew up. I’ve written teen short stories for several years. I discovered Clara Cemetery, the real place for part of my setting for Victoria and the Ghost about the time my granddaughter was going through her rebellious teens. The two things just clicked in my feeble brain.

What is your favorite part of writing for this group? What is the greatest challenge?

Favorite part – It’s just plain fun. You have the freedom to say things an adult wouldn’t say for fear they’d offend someone. Giggle.

Greatest challenge – Hands down, it’s keeping up with the latest technology  that’s commonplace with teens. Also keeping abreast of the “in” sayings. Thank God for my grandkids’ help and kids in my church. They never realize how much I study them.

Can you tell us what your latest book is all about?

At fifteen, Victoria, a city girl, loses her mother’s love and copes with country isolation, no friends, and no one who cares, until she meets a ghost.

When her mother leaves the family to become a Dallas trophy wife, Victoria’s dad moves her and her sister to a North Texas farm to herd cattle and raise chickens. Refusing to believe this is more than a temporary set-back, Victoria tries to make new friends which isn’t an easy task. The first one stabs her in the back with gossip and a sharp tongue. Meanwhile, her new stepsister takes Victoria’s place in her mother’s heart. Rejection and anger stalk Victoria like a rattlesnake in the cemetery. Good thing she makes friends with a ghost and through him, a good-looking teenaged cowboy.

What inspired you to write it?Victoria and the Ghost - Cover

As I said, the real Clara Cemetery caught my attention, a well-maintained area on the lonely plains, like a Garden of Eden in the midst of desert. Another thing, that brought that inspiration was my granddaughter left a huge high school to go to graduate from a much smaller one with only 100 in her graduating class. She called it “that hick school.” Funny, but that made me think how traumatic something like that is to a teen.

Where can readers purchase a copy?

You can purchase it from my publisher at:

http://www.4rvpublishingcatalog.com/janet-brown.php

It can also be found on Amazon. The link is:

http://www.amazon.com/Victoria-Ghost-Janet-K-Brown/dp/0983801878/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=

What is up next for you?

I’m 2/3 through with a sequel to Victoria and the Ghost. For those who read that one, they will remember Victoria’s irritating friend/enemy, red-headed Shelley. This will be her story of a country girl who must move to the city without friends or horses.

Her father gets a job as a janitor at the old Collin County Courthouse. When he fights alcoholism, Shelley covers his job for him. I explore the ghost legend at the old courthouse at McKinney, Texas. My working title for the manuscript is A Ghost for Shelley.

I plan on once again pitching it to Vivian Zabel at 4RV Publishing. I can only keep my fingers crossed.

Thank you for spending time with us today, Janet. We wish you much success.

Thank you so much, Cheryl, for allowing me to tell you and your readers about my story.

 

A Boy Called Duct Tape by Christopher Cloud

 A fast-paced, action-packed adventure story is what you’ll find in the young adult novel titled, A Boy Called Duct Tape.

Pedro Perez’s family is poor–so poor, his classmates have taken to calling him Duct Tape for the tape that holds his sneakers together. When Pedro discovers a $20 gold coin at the bottom of Harper’s Hole, he’s sure he’s found a piece of Jesse James’s treasure, rumored to be hidden in the Ozark mountains. Hiring a local spelunker, Pedro, his younger sister, Pia, and their 13-year-old cousin, Kiki, go on an underground adventure in the hopes of finding a treasure that could change all their lives.

Author Christopher Cloud has created an exciting adventure story with A Boy Called Duct Tape. A 12-year-old unpopular kid, his nine-year-old sister with a bad leg, and his cousin who is visiting, are an engaging trio of young treasure hunters. After performing research to find out how much the $20 gold coin is worth, Pedro is convinced it is part of the spoils from the James brothers’ heists. The three decide to hire Monroe Huff, a local spelunker to guide them through the cave using a $1 treasure map sold at the county fair.

A Boy Called Duct Tape is part history lesson, part geology lesson, and all pure enjoyment. Simpler in content than some young adult novels geared toward an older audience, the constant action will keep readers turning the pages. Cloud’s style and a superb plot blend together with his wonderful cast of characters to provide an overall great story.

As a parent, I only had one complaint. No mother in her right mind would allow her two young children and her niece to make a potentially life-threatening journey with a total stranger. While the reader isn’t privy to how Pedro unfurls his plan to his mother, she is the one who drives the three kids to meet Monroe Huff on the day they start their treasure hunt; and she knows they might be staying overnight. She briefly talks with Huff and then tells the kids she trusts him, gushing over how he called her ma’am. Now, I could easily believe the kids hatched this plan and didn’t tell the mother they were taking off with Huff, leaving behind a note for her to find once she returned home from work that day, but having the mother approve of the trip after meeting Huff once was a huge stumbling block for me. It’s the one dent in what is otherwise a flawless read.

A Boy Called Duct Tape by Christopher Cloud is a fabulous book. I’ll definitely be looking for more from him in the future.

Rating:  🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

  • Paperback:188 pages
  • Publisher:CreateSpace (April 6, 2012)
  • ISBN-10:1470006332
  • ISBN-13: 978-1470006334
  • SRP:  $8.35
  • Kindle version: $.99

I received a free Kindle version of this book through Pump Up Y our Book virtual book tours in exchange for my honest opinion. I received no monetary compensation for this review.

Review: The Priest and The Peaches by Larry Peterson

Travel back to the Bronx in the unforgettable journey of the Peach kids and their ally Father Sullivan.

When Pops passes away, the newly orphaned Peach kids struggle to know what to do. Over the course of the next few days, they learn exactly what their father meant to so many people. When their neighbor decides to create problems for the unsupervised children living above her, they find a staunch ally in Father Sullivan. With his help, they soon come to know the importance of family, faith and forgiveness.

The Priest and the Peaches is the debut young adult historical e-book released by Tribute Books and authored by Larry Peterson. Peterson also wrote Slippery Willie’s Stupid, Ugly Shoes, which we reviewed here. This is a moving story of one family’s life turned upside down by the sudden and unexpected death of their father. In addition to Peterson’s keen eye for detail, he provides readers a good glimpse into life in the Bronx in the mid-60’s. What I feel the author excelled in is how the characters evolved throughout the story. I was glad to see that not everyone had a change of heart, which kept the story real.

The book has an excellent message of how faith and family play a significant role in our lives. It also shares the message of forgiveness and second chances. What I truly enjoyed is how the story showed that kids often don’t know everything about their parents and the impact they have on other people. The Peach kids and the readers learn that Pops is a lot more than meets the eye.

I didn’t, however, care for the third person omniscient point of view. This book has a strong narrator, and as such, it was harder to get inside the characters’ heads than if the book was told from a different POV. Sometimes the characters sounded the same to me, and I didn’t like how the narrator would step outside of the present story to mention how things would play out in the future. I felt the book would have been stronger and moved more swiftly if told perhaps from Teddy’s point of view. Teddy is the oldest of the Peach kids and is now responsible, along with his seventeen-year-old sister, Joanie to care for their three younger brothers.

The Priest and The Peaches by Larry Peterson is a story you won’t soon forget. It inspires with its excellent messages. It will touch your heart and even make you laugh at times. I’m glad to hear the author is working on a sequel. I would love to know more about the Peaches.

Rating:  🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

Publisher:  Tribute Books

ISBN: 978-0-9837418-4-8
ISBN: 978-1-4658-6327-0
Pages: 285

The book’s official site is:
http://www.ThePriestandthePeaches.com

Larry Peterson’s blog:
http://www.ThePriestandthePeaches.com

Larry Peterson’s Facebook:
http://www.facebook.com/#!/larrytpbx

Larry Peterson’s Twitter:
http://www.twitter.com/slipperywillie

Tribute Books website:
http://www.tribute-books.com

Tribute Books Facebook:
http://www.facebook.com/pages/Archbald-PA/Tribute-Books/171628704176

Tribute Books Twitter:
http://www.twitter.com/TributeBooks

Kindle buy link
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B006P0EYI8/ref=as_li_tf_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=tributebooks-20&linkCode=as2&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=B006P0EYI8

Nook buy link (coming soon)

iBookstore buy link (coming soon)

Smashwords buy link
https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/116166?ref=tributebooks

PDF buy link
https://www.payloadz.com/go/sip?id=1538819

 

Interview with Beth Goobie, Author of Born Ugly

Beth Goobie graduated from the University of Winnipeg and the Mennonite Brethren Bible College. She is an award-winning writer of young adult fiction and is best known for her quirky and dark stories. Her novel Before Wings won the Canadian Library Association’s Young Adult Book Award in 2000, and was chosen by young readers for the Best Books list of the American Library Association. Her novel, Born Ugly, was released in September.

Thank you for joining us today, Beth. Can you please start off by telling us a bit about yourself?

I’d be glad to. I was born in 1959 and am currently 52 years old. I’ve been through a lot of changes in my life. I’ve lived in five different Canadian provinces, as well as a small Dutch village. At one point I was religious, and now I’m not. I’ve worked as everything from a weed-puller, janitor, piano teacher and nanny, to a group home staff. In addition, I’ve been through two major illnesses, one of which left me legally blind in my left eye at the age of twenty-four; both illnesses dramatically altered the direction of my life. All these experiences significantly changed the way I grew up thinking. I’m grateful for that.

When did you first get bit by the writing bug?

I’ve wanted to be a writer since I started reading. I still have a story about a princess that I wrote at age six.

Why did you decide to write stories for the YA market?

With respect, I’ve never thought of what I do as writing for a market. I write primarily for myself – for the teenager who still lives inside me. If it works for the fifteen-year-old me, there is hope it will connect with other young people. But I never think of those young people as a “market.” That’s the publisher’s job.

What is your favorite part of writing for this group? What is the greatest challenge?

My favorite part of writing for teenagers is living the teenage characters that I’m currently writing about. I find young people to be vivid, smart, funny, and vulnerable. Trying to keep up with the characters in my novels keeps me on my toes, makes me feel more alive in my ancient, 52-year-old body – as if there are still more changes ahead of me, as if further growth is still possible.

The biggest challenge in writing for YA readers is the same as it is in writing for any genre or age group – to get up every day, ignore the “I can’t” voice in my head, and firmly, steadily write another paragraph, another page, another chapter. It’s the discipline of it all – the discipline of hope.

Can you tell us what your latest book is all about?

Born Ugly is about a decidedly non-photogenic sixteen-year-old girl named Shirley, and the way she is treated, which is despicably. Basically it’s about bullying based on appearance. Shirley also gets caught up – unwittingly – in the drug trade, but it’s primarily about how society treats those it deems physically unattractive.

What inspired you to write it?

My appearance comes in around average, but in junior high I looked odd. I come from a low-income family, and in junior high I was still wearing the cat-eye glasses I had initially received in grade three, as well as polyester pants I had started wearing in grade five. In addition, I had prominent buck teeth and braces. I was an obvious target for bullies, and they let me have it – remorselessly. And, like Shirley, I was also being abused at home, so I had nowhere to turn for comfort. As an adult, I felt a need to go back and give voice to those experiences – that part of me that so often had to endure being called “Dog Face.” Born Ugly is the result.

Where can readers purchase a copy?

As far as I know, your local bookstore. If there isn’t one on the shelf, you can ask the clerk to special-order one in – there should be no extra cost.

Do you have a website and/or blog where readers can find out more?

No. Since I’m legally blind in my left eye, the resulting double focus means a headache if I spend much time on a computer or watching TV. So I don’t.

What is up next for you?

Red Deer Press has accepted an “easy-read” juvenile novel called Jason’s Why for publication in 2012. It’s about a nine-year-old boy’s first few days in a group home. And I’m currently completing my 17th YA novel. After that, I’ve got the first thirty pages of another YA novel waiting.

Do you have anything else to add?

I would like to express my immense gratitude to the Canada Council for the creative writing grant that funded the writing of Born Ugly. And if anyone is looking for a respectful, scrupulous editing and publishing experience, I heartily recommend Peter Carver and Red Deer Press. Thanks also to The Children’s and Teens Book Connection for your interest.

Thank you for spending time with us today, Beth. We wish you much success.