Blogging at Christian Children’s Authors – Summer Reading Programs

 

The first Friday of the month finds me blogging at Christian Children’s Authors. Today’s topic is summer reading programs. You can find my post at http://christianchildrensauthors.com/2017/06/02/summer-reading-programs

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Children’s Book Week 2016

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Children’s Book Week is a national celebration of books and reading that was founded in 1919. Libraries and bookstores around the United States hold all kinds of events in honor of Children’s Book Week. To find out more, visit http://www.bookweekonline.com/

Here are a couple events in Massachusetts:

Wellesley Books

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May 7, 10:30am:
Heather Lang (Fearless Flyer), Cheryl Lawton Malone (Dario and the Whale), Deborah Sosin (Charlotte and the Quiet Place), and Jane Sutcliffe (Will’s Words)

Eight Cousins Bookstore

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May 5, 5pm: What the Kids Are Reading! panel featuring local librarians and teachers.

Happy World Book Day!

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World Book Day celebrates the joy and value of books and reading, especially for children. Nurseries, schools and libraries across the UK celebrate World Book Day on the first Thursday in March. For more information, please visit: http://www.worldbookday.com/

Children’s Book Week: May 2th – 8th!

 

“Since 1919, Children’s Book Week has been celebrated countrywide with author & illustrator appearances, parties, storytelling, and other book-related events in schools, libraries, bookstores, clubs — anywhere where kids and books connect.”

Visit the Children’s Book Week website at www.bookweekonline.com to view events taking place across the country and to learn more about this annual celebration.

How will you celebrate Children’s Book Week?



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Support The Million Book Read

“The Million Book Read is an international literacy pledge campaign designed to motivate into action adults taking time to read with children. The goal is to confirm 1 Million participants reading with kids Super Bowl XLV week.

At Super Bowl XLV, February 2011, the Million Book Read will host over 5,000 kids for a day of celebrating the joy of reading.

Your participation supports our effort to sustain the delivery of literacy programs to families of all cultures through select non-profit organizations.”

For more information, please visit http://millionbookread.com/!

Audio Books–Do You Listen to Them?

 Children’s Book Week has meant all sorts of new adventures for me. In addition to going to see a production based upon Judy Blume’s classic Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing, I am reading a book in a format I usually avoid–audio.

I have a confession to make first. I didn’t know this was an audio book when I requested it from the Amazon Vine program. This program allows you to request a certain number of items each month and post a review on Amazon. I don’t participate much in the program because I have so many other books to read for my blogs, but when I find something of interest I’ll send in a request.

I am currently working on a middle grade historical, part of which will be set at Wheaton College in Norton, MA–which during the time of my story was Wheaton Female Seminary. I wanted to get a feel for life at an all girl seminary and thought Wishing for Tomorrow by Hilary McKay would be perfect. When I discovered it was an audio book, I have to admit I was disappointed. I’m not the kind of person who can listen to music while she works, let alone try to pay enough attention to a story at the same time I’m working.

I have found, however, that these compact discs are perfect to listen to in my truck while on the way to the grocery store or when I have a bunch of errands to run. I’m truly enjoying the story. The characters are all so different, and narrator Justine Eyre does a wonderful job of breathing life into these characters and capturing their essence.

Do you listen to audio books? If yes, how often? What do you like about them? Is there anything you don’t like about audio books?



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Judy Blume’s Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing at Springfield Symphony Hall

I decided to celebrate Children’s Book Week with a new adventure. I went on a field trip with the Lil Diva’s third grade class to see a local production of Judy Blume’s classic, Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing. This book tells the story of poor Peter who is beside himself because of his brother Fudgie’s cuteness, constant meddling in Peter’s things, and total bratiness.

I had never read this book, even though I was a big Judy Blume fan as a kid. This production was hilarious. I couldn’t decide, however, if I was angry over how inept the parents were portrayed or if it added  to the charm of the whole thing.

I keep thinking to some of the modern-day cartoons and shows, and how the adults are created to be such boobs.  Fairly Oddparents comes to mind. Is anyone familiar with that one? It’s a Nick cartoon where Timmy Turner is a young boy who has fairy godparents who grant his every wish because his life is so miserable. His parents care about almost everything more than Timmy and his babysitter is pure evil. Yes, it sets the stage for many hilarious antics, but couldn’t that happen without making his parents seem so self-absorbed?

iCarly is another show that comes to mind. I like the premise of three kids putting together a web show and doing some silly stuff, but Mrs. Benson is portrayed as a total nut job. She is so paranoid that something will happen to Freddie that she had a tracking chip placed in his brain, has a first aid kit the size of an equipment shed, and makes him wear antibacterial underwear. The teachers at Carly’s school–outside of Principal Franklin, who after the kids get him his job back, admits in an episode that he loves Carly, Sam, and Freddie–are portrayed as mean-spirited people who don’t like kids.

As a mom I can’t help but worry about the message shows like this send to our children; though it’s possible I’ve analyzed these shows much more than the average kid will.

Overall, I am glad I went to see this production at Springfield Symphony Hall. Though the day was cool and rainy, the kids enjoyed getting out and watching a play based upon a book they had recently read in school. I might pick up a copy of Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing by Judy Blume to see how closely the production followed the book. My daughter mentioned a few differences on the way home.

What did you do today to celebrate Children’s Book Week? Do you think some books and television shows portray parents in a bad light? Do you still let your children read or watch them?



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