Credo by Peter Bagge

The life story of the feminist founder of the American libertarian movement 

Peter Bagge returns with a biography of another fascinating twentieth-century trailblazer–the writer, feminist, war correspondent, and libertarian Rose Wilder Lane. Following the popularity and critical acclaim of Woman Rebel: The Margaret Sanger Story and Fire!! The Zora Neale Hurston Story, Credo: The Rose Wilder Lane Story is a fast-paced, charming, informative look at the brilliant Lane. Among other achievements, she was a founder of the American libertarian movement and a champion of her mother, Laura Ingalls Wilder, in bringing the classic Little House on the Prairie series to the American public.

Much like Sanger and Hurston, Lane was an advocate for women’s rights who led by example, challenging norms in her personal and professional life. Anti-government and anti-marriage, Lane didn’t think that gender should hold anyone back from experiencing all the world had to offer. Though less well-known today, in her lifetime she was one of the highest-paid female writers in America and a political and literary luminary, friends with Herbert Hoover, Dorothy Thompson, Sinclair Lewis, and Ayn Rand, to name a few. Bagge’s portrait of Lane is heartfelt and affectionate, probing into the personal roots of her rugged individualism. Credo is a deeply researched dive into a historical figure whose contributions to American society are all around us, from the books we read to the politics we debate.

‘It’s irresistible to try and imagine what Hurston would make of this book, and inevitable to conclude that she’d approve.’NPR Best Books of 2017

‘A bright, highly moving introduction to a figure who is no longer obscure, but the full range of whose accomplishments we have yet to take into account.’ Los Angeles Review of Books

Peter Bagge is the Harvey Award–winning author of the acclaimed nineties alternative-comic series Hate, starring slacker hero Buddy Bradley, and a regular contributor to Reason magazine. A graduate of the School of Visual Arts in New York City, he got his start in comics in the R. Crumb–edited magazine Weirdo. Bagge lives in Seattle with his wife, Joanne, their daughter, and three cats.

Hardcover: 108 pages
Publisher: Drawn & Quarterly Publications
Release Date: April 16, 2019
Audience: Ages 16+
Subjects: Comics Graphic Novels Literary Nonfiction Biography Memoir Autobiography
EAN: 9781770463xxx

Order here!

HarperCollins Publishing Releases Little House Series in Digital Formats!

This is the day Little House fans have been waiting for–HarperCollins Publishers released the series for e-readers today!

It looks like they are only offering a 5-eBook set on the HCP website, but if you visit:

Amazon
Barnes and Noble
GooglePlay

you will find all nine books available in digital format.

What would Laura think of this new way to read her books?

From the Family Bookshelf

childrenreading000006462340xsmall1

So many books, so very little time. Going back to work has truly hampered my ability to get much reading done. I have been nursing one book for months–not because it isn’t interesting, just no time to read. The only other book I read was because I edited it.

Pulitzer Prize-nominated Caitlin Rother’s book, Dead Reckoning, is a true crime story. French Illusions: From Tours to Paris by Linda Kovic-Skow is a sequel to her first book and continues her story of studying abroad.

Dad is reading a Clive Cussler book in his spare time. The Lil’ Diva just finished the last book in the Harry Potter Series and the Lil’ Princess is reading On the Way Home, a travel diary by Laura Ingalls Wilder.

What are you reading these days?

From the Family Bookshelf – March 2015

childrenreading000006462340xsmall1

 

Can you believe I haven’t posted one of these updates since October? Whoops! As the girls have grown older, it’s become more of a challenge because I don’t always know what they are reading. In addition, my return to work has reduced my reading time when I had hoped last year and this one would see an increase in my reading.

I won’t bother trying to go through every book I have read since my last update, but here are some notables:

  • Little Author in the Big Woods by Yona Zeldis McDonough, a middle grade biography of Laura Ingalls Wilder,
  • River Spirits by Marilyn Meredith, the latest in her Deputy Tempe Crabtree series,
  • Fearless Joe Dearborne by Lisa Whitney, a middle grade adventure novel,
  • The Seven Levels of Communication by Michael Maher, a business book,
  • Death of a Clown by Heather Haven, a murder mystery set during World War II,
  • The Search for the Stone of Excalibur by Fiona Ingram, the second book in her Chronicles of the Stone Series.

As for Dad, he has been reading some Vince Flynn novels. The Lil’ Diva is currently reading the second Harry Potter book–a series she said she would never read–and the Lil’ Princess is reading the latest Dork Diaries book.

Papou (Greek for grandfather) is currently reading Killing Patton by Bill O’Reilly and Yia-Yia (Greek for grandmother) is polishing off another mystery novel–her favorite genre.

That’s it for now. Hope you have a great week.

Little Author in the Big Woods by Yona Zeldis McDonough

little author“Once upon a time, sixty years ago, a little girl lived in the Big Woods of Wisconsin, in a little gray house made of logs.”  This sentence opens Little House in the Big Woods by Laura Ingalls Wilder, the first in a series of children’s books that gave middle grade readers a glimpse into the life of America’s pioneer families. And for some–like myself–this would be the start of a lifelong desire to learn more about the real life of Laura, her sisters Mary, Carrie, and Grace, and her parents Charles and Caroline Ingalls.

In a style similar to the  Little House books, author Yona Zeldis McDonough has created a biography of Laura Ingalls Wilder aimed toward middle grade readers that not only helps point out the fact and the fiction behind Wilder’s classic children’s books, but also celebrates the independent mind of the Quiner and Ingalls women along the way.

McDonough’s book opens not with Wilder, but with a brief prologue discussing the life of Caroline Lake Quiner, who would one day become Caroline Ingalls. This sets the tone for the rest of this biography, as it highlights how Caroline’s mother, Charlotte, believed in higher education for girls; something Ma Ingalls also wanted for her daughters.

Told in chronological order, Little Author in the Big Woods follows Wilder’s life and the journeys she took not only with her family, but later with her husband Almanzo and daughter Rose. It talks about the hardships the Wilders faced as a young married couple and of their leaving De Smet, South Dakota to settle in Mansfield, Missouri. Readers learn about the building of the dream house on Rocky Ridge Farm and Wilder’s early career writing for the Missouri Ruralist, before moving on to the creation of the Little House series. McDonough ends with an epilogue that discusses the longevity of Wilder’s work and Michael Landon’s classic television show, Little House on the Prairie, which is based upon the books. Readers are also treated to quotes from Laura Ingalls Wilder, details on some of the games that Laura played, crafts, and recipes. Also included is a list of other writings by Wilder and a list with some of the other books about her.

While I have to admit I learned little new about Laura Ingalls Wilder as a result, I believe middle grade readers will enjoy getting to know more about her real life and the independent nature of the women in the Quiner, Ingalls, and Wilder families. With a similar writing style and design to the Little House series, readers will feel right at home with this book. Jennifer Thermes did an excellent job in capturing the essence of McDonough’s book and Wilder’s life with her beautiful illustrations. I’m thrilled to add Little Author in the Big Woods to my Laura Ingalls Wilder collection.

 

Rating: 🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

Age Range: 8 – 12 years
Grade Level: 3 – 7
Series: Christy Ottaviano Books
Hardcover: 176 pages
Publisher: Henry Holt and Co. (BYR); First Edition edition (September 16, 2014)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 080509542X
ISBN-13: 978-0805095425

I received a copy of this book from the author. This review contains my honest opinions, which I have not been compensated for in any way.

My Laura Ingalls Wilder Adventure

little house

 

Perhaps you didn’t know exactly how nerdy I am, but once I tell you what I am doing you will know for sure. I leave Tuesday for a Laura Ingalls Wilder adventure. I am flying to Wisconsin, where I will meet an Ingalls relative and a Wilder relative. We, along with three other Laura Ingalls Wilder and Little House on the Prairie (television show) fans, will be spending the following eight days visiting some Laura Ingalls Wilder sites and attending a 40th Anniversary Little House on the Prairie Cast Reunion taking place in Walnut Grove, Minnesota over the weekend.

Told you. Total nerd.

This will be the only time I do something like this. My girls aren’t into my whole obsession, so I knew if I planned this it would have to be just me and my friends. I’m not bringing much technology, so I won’t be blogging or posting pictures online until we get back. I’ll be sharing my adventures when we return at my Laura Ingalls Wilder blog: http://lauralittlehouseontheprairie.blogspot.com/

Farmer Boy Goes West by Heather Williams

Farmer Boy Goes West by Heather Williams is the story of fourteen-year-old Almanzo Wilder going West with his parents, older sister Alice, and baby brother Perly.

Mother receives a letter from her brother George, who lives in Spring Valley, Minnesota. He encourages the Wilders to pay him and his new wife a visit to see if they would like to move there.

It takes months of preparations, but once winter is over, the Wilders board a train to start their journey to Spring Valley. Royal and Eliza Jane are being left behind to watch the farm in Malone, New York. Almanzo is excited to go, but he knows he will miss his horse, Starlight.
Farmer Boy Goes West is a superb addition to the Laura Ingalls Wilder and Little House legacy. Meant to serve as a sequel to Wilder’s Farmer Boy, this story of a teenage Almanzo going West captures all the excitement and adventure of the original Little House books, while providing some insight into the man Laura Ingalls would eventually marry.

A healthy blend of fact and fiction, Williams captures the essence of the original Little House books, while maintaining an air of her own style. The events in this book are condensed to two years instead of the five years it actually took for the Wilders to make their move from New York to Minnesota. She also took liberties with some of the historical characters. I don’t feel that had a negative impact on the story, but those who are sticklers for facts might have an issue with it. I’m hoping not, since this is a truly delightful story. The only thing that really made me stop for a second came in the second chapter, when it said, “One day in January, soon after Almanzo’s fourteenth birthday…” Almanzo’s birthday is in February. While Wilder did play around with the Wilder siblings’ birthdays in Farmer Boy–making Almanzo closer in age to his older brother and sister–as far as I recall, she didn’t change the month Almanzo was born.

As with any great story, things aren’t always easy. Almanzo ends up having to attend a new school in Minnesota. He has to make new friends. He misses Starlight and Royal, maybe even his bossy older sister, Eliza Jane. He likes a girl at school, but is shy and has no idea how to get to know her. His Aunt Martha isn’t very happy about jamming the Wilders into their tiny home.

There are also some neat surprises and interesting historical characters added in, but you won’t know what or who those are unless you read the book.

I’m thrilled to add Farmer Boy Goes West to my Little House collection.

Rating:  🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂
Reading level: Ages 8 and up
Hardcover: 320 pages
Publisher: HarperCollins (February 14, 2012)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 0061242519
ISBN-13: 978-0061242519
SRP: $15.99 

I purchased a copy of this book from Amazon. This review contains my honest opinions, for which I have not been compensated in any way.