Dr. Seuss’ The Lorax in Theaters Now!

Dr. Seuss’ The Lorax took the top spot at the box office this weekend. I’m not surprised. Not only was it released close to the beloved author’s birthday, but many schools–especially around here since Theodore Geisel grew up about ten minutes from where we live–read The Lorax during their Dr. Seuss day celebrations. With the voice talents of Danny DeVito, Ed Helms, Zac Efron, Taylor Swift and Betty White, to name a few, I have a feeling audiences will be busting a gut if they go see this movie.

You can check out the trailer and other free downloads at www.theloraxmovie.com.

Do you and your family plan to see the movie or have you already been? Feel free to share your thoughts.

The Legacy of Stan and Jan Berenstain

Jan Berenstain, the co-author of more than 300 books died at the end of February. Her husband and writing partner, Stan, died in 2005. As I considered what I would write about Mrs. Berenstain’s passing, I began thinking what an amazing number of books she and her husband had written together. Many marriages don’t last a lifetime anymore, never mind the thought of working with your spouse for over forty years.

But that’s what the Berenstain’s did. They lived together and worked together to create some of the most beloved books in children’s literature. I’ve read them, my children read them, and if I have my say in it, my future grandchildren will read them. Looking back upon Mama Bear, Papa Bear, Brother Bear and Sister Bear, I don’t remember being conscious of the lessons I was learning as a child when I read these books. I just remember enjoying them. As a parent, I’m glad for books that teach so many valuable principles.

In this article on Mrs. Berenstain’s death from The New York Times, they credited their first editor at Random House, Theodor Geisel–or as most of us know him, Dr. Seuss–for helping them achieve their trademark style that made these books popular as reading primers.

Though my kids are too old for them now, I can’t seem to part with my collection. They are sitting in the floor of my office in a box. Every once in a while the Lil Princess (8) picks one up, but she is an advanced reader, so she’s reading much more involved books than these now. My favorite of the series remains, The Bears’ Vacation. Originally released in 1968 (exactly a month after I was born), Papa Bear demonstrates his seaside safety rules with funny and disastrous results.

As a way to celebrate the legacy of the Berenstains, I hope you’ll share your favorite Berenstain Bears book.

The Butt Book by Artie Bennett

Every once in a while you come across a book that you immediately call out to the kids and say, “Come here, you have to see this book!” That’s what I did when I received an email from Artie Bennett that included a PDF that said “Butt Book.” Now, I’m sorry, but for something that says that, I’ll risk downloading a virus.  Okay, maybe not, but it definitely was worth it.

I laughed like crazy as I read The Butt Book. I don’t know how many of you own The Tooth Book by Theo. LeSieg–who knows Dr. Seuss rather well–but, The Butt Book, is a sillier, zanier version of that story and talks about bottoms, how handy they are to have, and many of the creatures who have them.

My daughters have brought every one of their friends up to my office to read this book. It is uproariously funny, and the illustrations provided by Mike Lester are just as crazy as Bennett’s rhymes.

I have never laughed so hard in my life. Boys and girls will love this one!

Rating:  🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

  • Publisher: Bloomsbury USA Children’s Books 
  • ISBN-10: 1599903113
  • ISBN-13: 978-1599903118
  • SRP:  $16.99 


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    From the Family Bookshelf

     

    It’s time again–actually, this is past due–for From the Family Bookshelf–the weekly (so far, so good) column talking about the books we’re reading, have read or want to read. There’s Mom (me), Dad (slowest reader in the world), the Lil Diva (reluctant reader extraordinaire), and the Lil Princess (bookworm in training).

    I’ll let Dad go first this time, but that’s because I’m going to pick on him. Yes, he is still reading the thriller, Prayers for the Assassin , by Robert Ferrigno. Can you imagine how big my TBR pile would be if I read as slow as he does?

    As for me, I’ve lucked out and hit a really good patch in the reading cycle.  Not many books that I haven’t thoroughly enjoyed. Since last time, I’ve read:

    The Way I See It: A Look Back at My Life on Little House a memoir by Melissa Anderson. Anderson played the character of Mary Ingalls on the classic 70’s family show, Little House on the Prairie

    Jack’s Dreams Come to Life by Sara Jackson (children’s picture book)

    The Raindrop by Brian McClure (children’s picture book)

    Mr. Vinegar and the Frozen Sea by Chris Wardle (middle grade/tween chap book)

    The Soggy Town of Hilltop by Kevin McNamee (children’s picture book)

    My Dog Tim and Other Stories by Garasamo Maccagnone (literary story collection)

    The Elf of Luxembourg: An Alex and Jackie Adventure by Tom Weston (YA fantasy)

    Faith & Finances: A Journey to Financial Dependence by various authors

    Some of these reviews have been posted here: Jack’s Dreams Come to Life, The Raindrop, Mr. Vinegar and the Frozen Sea, and The Soggy Town of Hilltop.  Tom Weston’s book will be reviewed here on Friday. My review of Melissa Anderson’s book appears at Laura’s Little Houses, my Laura Ingalls Wilder  blog. The other books will be reviewed at The Book Connection.

    I just started reading the novel Conflicts with Interest by Michael Ruddy. I’m also reading The Three Dimensions of Character by Larry Brooks.

    Wow! I take a up a lot of space. Now onto the girls.

    The Lil Diva is still in Justin Bieber heaven, but she is managing to get some other reading done. She just finished Junie B. Jones Loves Handsome Warren (RH Books for Young Readers) by Barbara Park. There are few books I can get her to read without an argument. Junie B. Jones books fall in that category.

    The Lil Princess has read a few books this week. Now that she’s beginning to recognize more words she wants to read to me at night instead of the other way around. Two books I remember from this week are The Silly Scarecrow by Danielle Denega. This is a Clifford Puppy Days book from Scholastic geared toward kids in K – 2.

    Her other popular book of the week is What Do Smurfs Do All Day? by Peyo. This book is part of the Dr. Seuss Beginning Readers Collection.  I’m sure it belonged to my son, who watched Smurfs, as did my sister and I when we were younger. My sister had the Smurf village toys that were popular when the cartoon first came out.  The Cartoon Network was airing reruns of Smurfs for a while and my girls really liked the show.  A great show, like a great book, never goes out of style.

    Until next time, keep reading!



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    From the Family Bookshelf

     

    Here we are once again.  It’s time for From the Family Bookshelf, the weekly (hopefully) column that talks about the books that we’re reading, have read, or want to read. There’s four of us in this little old house:  Mom (me), Dad, the Lil Diva (8), and the Lil Princess (6).

    Let’s see what we’re all up to this week!

    I’ll go first again this week. I just wrote up three book reviews: Noonie’s Masterpiece (MG), The Power of Your Child’s Imagination (Parenting), and The Way to Stillness (inspirational self-help). I posted one of these so far. The other two will appear later this week at The Book Connection. I also have two other reviews left to write.

    I am going to start Faith and Finances tonight. This is a book by several authors who collaborated to bring you spiritual insight and practical advice on:

    “Faith – Finance – Tithing – Provision – Generous Giving – Budgeting – Unemployment and Bankruptcy – Struggling to Pay Bills, Set Up and Manage a Budget – Concerns over Financial Security – Household Budgets – God Promises Daily Provisions – Living By Faith, Giving Away Wealth and much more.”

    Dad is still muddling through the thriller, Prayers for the Assassin , by Robert Ferrigno. Did I mention he’s a slow reader?  🙂 He’s liking it, so that’s what matters.

    The Lil Diva was happy to return to school today and find that her latest Scholastic book order had come in. It contained the much coveted Justin Bieber CD and a book on the teen pop sensation, Justin Bieber His World by Riley Brooks. I’m honestly not sure why she is so into Justin Bieber, but if it gets her to read, then she can buy every book about this teen pop sensation ever printed.

    The Lil Princess surprised me this week and picked up Hop on Pop by Dr. Seuss.  She likes her Dr. Seuss books, but lately she’s come away from them and seeks more challenging material. She has one of the Diary of a Wimpy Kid books if that gives you any clue as to what I am talking about. She’s can’t really read those, but she usually leans toward more complex books.

    Until next time, keep reading!



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    Answer to Dr. Seuss Trivia Question

    Yesterday we asked the following trivia question about Dr. Seuss:

    “Which Dr. Seuss book used just 220 words?”

    The correct answer, according to Don’t Know Much About Anything Else by Kenneth C. Davis is The Cat in the Hat, which was written in response to 1954 reports of poor reading in America.

    According to Common Knowledge, the classic Green Eggs and Ham was written using only 47 words that were arranged and re-arranged in different patterns.

    And that, my friends, is your Dr. Seuss trivia lesson for today. I’m glad I decided to talk about one of our most famous local children’s authors. I hope you enjoyed these posts.

    Dr. Seuss Trivia from Don’t Know Much About Anything Else by Kenneth C. Davis

    I had the chance to read Don’t Know Much About Anything Else by Kenneth C. Davis in 2008. You can read the review here.

    Dr. Seuss was featured on Page 45. Here is a trivia question from that book:

    “Which Dr. Seuss book used just 220 words?”

    Do you care to take a guess?  You won’t win anything but at least you’ll have a bit of Dr. Seuss trivia to share with your friends.

    We’ll share the answer tomorrow.