New from 4RV Publishing

Emma loves bedtime. She laughs when Poppa pretends to place her in the dog’s bed, the kitchen sink, and other silly places instead of her bed. Once you discover what happens when Poppa finally places her in her bed, you’ll want to play This Isn’t My Bed with your own children.

Hi! My name is Fred. I am a tornado siren. Oh, you don’t know what a tornado siren is? My friends and I watch over people. We let them know when a tornado might be coming.

Open the pages and read my story. I am a Storm Sentinel.

Many stars brighten the sky at night, so does every person have one? One child finds his own stellar companion that follows him everywhere.

Why Does That Star Follow Me? let’s readers discover the child’s discovery.

For these and other 4RV Publishing titles, please visit www.4rvpublishingcatalog.com

New from Guardian Angel Publishing

Roy the little red tractor is looking for a good job. He gets sent to Tanzania, Africa to help an orphanage build sidewalks so the nanny’s can walk the babies in their strollers. He is afraid to go there because of the wild animals but is very pleased when he gets there and sees all the babies he is helping.

All the proceeds from this book go to Neema Village, a rescue center for abandoned, orphaned and at risk babies in Arusha Tanzania, East Africa. There are more than 3,000,000 orphaned children in Tanzania. Learn more at www.neemavillage.org

Tired of the way he’s always lived, the big bad wolf is ready for a change. His family, on the other hand, is still far from it. Will he handle the pressure? No one should miss this humorous and heartfelt untold story of what became of the big bad wolf.

Shouts of “Hip Hip Hooray! We’re going to the beach today!” peak the curiosity of Gracie and Grover Groundhog. Disregarding their parents’ instruction against mingling with people, the two stow away and join in the adventure. Will they be discovered? What will they think of the beach? Will they be safe? Will they get back home to their parents?

For more information on these and other Guardian Angel Publishing titles, please visit www.guardianangelpublishing.com

Clavis Fall 2019 Release: Fall with Lily and Milo by Pauline Oud

 

Fall is here! Lily and Milo go exploring in the woods. They see a hedgehog, nuts, apples, mushrooms, and lots of colored leaves. The woods are so pretty in fall! Milo wants to take everything home.

A simple and interactive story about the woods in the fall. For toddlers ages 24 months and up, with a focus on the child’s world.

Age Range: 2 – 6 years
Series: Lily and Milo
Hardcover: 32 pages
Publisher: Clavis (September 24, 2019)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1605374598
ISBN-13: 978-1605374598

Order here!

Most Popular Children’s Book the Year You Were Born

 

 

Not that I have a lot of free time, but when I do it is neat to check out articles about popular things from the year I was born. While on MSN today, this article was one of those on their homepage: “The Most Popular Children’s Book The Year You Were Born.” It starts with 1950 and goes through last year. What a joy going remembering some of the books from my childhood. I also learned that Corduroy by Don Freeman was the most popular book in 1968–the year I was born.

Enjoy traveling through this history of children’s books at MSN.

The Adventures of Riley & Elfy by E. Matheson

The Adventures of Riley & Elfy by E. Matheson is an adorable collection of children’s stories centered around friendship. Mysterious Scottish animals, Riley and Elfy have lived on faraway Scottish islands since ancient times, but no one seems to know much about them or that they exist. In this collection, Riley and Elfy make friends with creatures they meet along the way and share some great adventures.

If your children love animals, fantasy or adventure stories, then The Adventures of Riley & Elfy is a great choice. Told in the present tense, your youngster will enjoy following Riley and Elfy along. Though I can’t say I am a huge fan of present tense in children’s stories, it works well here. What truly makes this book are the stunning illustrations by G. B. Serafica. They are too beautiful even to describe.

My one challenge with this collection is the different grammar style was a total distraction. It’s probably not cost-effective, but if you’re publishing and selling in the States, it’s better to use our standards than those across the pond. The editor in me was twitching the entire time.

If you’re looking for an animal-filled adventure to share, The Adventures of Riley & Elfy is great fun.

Rating: 🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

File Size: 30487 KB
Print Length: 28 pages
Publisher: ASJ Publishing (July 8, 2018)
Publication Date: July 8, 2018
Sold by: Amazon Digital Services LLC
Language: English
ASIN: B07FCT36V7

I received a digital copy from the author. This review contains my honest opinions, which I have not been compensated for in any way.

The Boy and the Egg by Ellen Delange

A boy finds an abandoned egg and decides to take care of it. He wonders what is growing inside. Could it be the friend he has in mind?

A sweet story about caring and dealing with expectations. For children ages 4 and up,and for everyone who’s curious!

Age Range: 4 – 6 years
Grade Level: Preschool and up
Hardcover: 32 pages
Publisher: Clavis (February 1, 2019)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1605374601
ISBN-13: 978-1605374604

Purchase here!

Classic Christmas Stories for Children

We all have Christmas stories from our childhood that we still remember…some of us might even have a few of those classic storybooks in our houses now. Here are a few of my favorites.

 


Christmas is almost here, which means ice-skating, Christmas carols, and sparkly lights everywhere–even on Snoopy’s doghouse! Everyone is enjoying the holiday celebrations except Charlie Brown. Can the Peanuts gang help Charlie Brown discover the true meaning of Christmas?

This first one, I actually remember as an animated TV show. Each year it wouldn’t be Christmas without watching A Charlie Brown Christmas. Decades later, it was released as a children’s story. What a great way to honor this holiday tradition.

Dr. Seuss’s small-hearted Grinch ranks right up there with Scrooge when it comes to the crankiest, scowling holiday grumps of all time. For 53 years, the Grinch has lived in a cave on the side of a mountain, looming above the Whos in Whoville. The noisy holiday preparations and infernal singing of the happy little citizens below annoy him to no end. The Grinch decides this frivolous merriment must stop. His “wonderful, awful” idea is to don a Santa outfit, strap heavy antlers on his poor, quivering dog Max, construct a makeshift sleigh, head down to Whoville, and strip the chafingly cheerful Whos of their Yuletide glee once and for all.

This is another story I knew as a TV show first, but we still have this book in our basement. I never quite understood the orange cover, but this is a must read each Christmas.

Based upon the poem, “A Visit from St. Nicholas,” a father narrates this story of seeing Santa Claus on Christmas Eve. There are numerous versions of this story with a variety of illustrations. This is a pretty cover. I’ve also used the poem as inspiration for my own Christmas poetry.

 

The Best Christmas Pageant Ever follows the outrageous shenanigans of the Herdman siblings, or “the worst kids in the history of the world.” The siblings take over the annual Christmas pageant in a hilarious yet heartwarming tale involving the Three Wise Men, a ham, scared shepherds, and six rowdy kids.

Honestly, it took me a bit of time to warm up to this story, but now that I have, I love reading it from time to time.

“The Gift of the Magi” is a short story written by O. Henry (a pen name for William Sydney Porter), about a young married couple and how they deal with the challenge of buying secret Christmas gifts for each other with very little money. As a sentimental story with a moral lesson about gift-giving, it has been a popular one for adaptation, especially for presentation at Christmas time. The plot and its “twist ending” are well-known, and the ending is generally considered an example of cosmic irony.

This is another story that I had to warm up to. The message is wonderful, but I always felt it a tad too much for kids to handle. As an adult, I appreciate it a lot more.

What are a few Christmas classics you recall from your childhood?