The Golden Pathway by Donna McDine

 The Golden Pathway by Donna McDine is the touching story of one boy who is willing to take great risks to help someone in need.

Every night David listens to his pa mete out his punishments on the slaves working their farm. He smells the alcohol on his breath. He watches as Ma is never treated with respect. He never expects his pa to be nice to him.

One night after Pa whips their teenage slave, Jenkins, David sneaks out of the house and promises to help him escape to a better life.

The Underground Railroad, also considered the “golden path to freedom”, helped numerous slaves escape the hardships foisted upon them by their owners. In this inspiring story, McDine has brought this portion of history to life for readers ages 9 to 12. The Golden Pathway shows how just one person who cares can make a difference in this world. It is a moving story that will educate readers and encourage them to be a person who makes a difference.

I’ve been a fan of K.C. Snider’s artwork for some time, but she has truly outdone herself with The Golden Pathway. From the cover art to the interior illustrations, each brings David’s and Jenkins’ story to life in a visual way. From the tears running down David’s cheeks to a bent over Jenkins who has just endured another beating, and from chore time to a trip into town, Snider has captured every emotion, every tiny detail, right there on the page.

The Golden Pathway nearly moved me to tears. As someone who has spent a great deal of time studying this period of American history, I’m certain this book has the ability to make a great impression on its readers. I highly recommend it. I hope it finds its way into schools and homes everywhere, as this is a message, you won’t want your kids to miss.

Rating:  🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

  • Publisher: Guardian Angel Publishing, Inc
  • ISBN-10: 1616330880
  • ISBN-13: 978-1616330880
  • SRP:  $9.95 (paperback),  $15.95 (Hardcover), electronic formats available


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    America’s Black Founders by Nancy I. Sanders

     

    For an educational and fun reading experience look no further than America’s Black Founders: Revolutionary Heroes and Early Leaders by Nancy I. Sanders.

    In this engaging book geared for ages 9 – 12, Sanders brings America’s black Revolutionary hereos and early leaders to life with stories, historical photographs, and special features. While this book covers a variety of heroes and leaders–John Marrant, Lucy Terry Prince, Crispus Attucks, Salem Poor, Harry Hosier and many more–the story of Richard Allen, from his birth to his death flows through the entire book, weaving in and out of the times in which Allen lived.

    Also included are 21 activities that youngsters will enjoy. From stuffing a straw mattress to making a stamp, from how to pen a patriotic poem to designing a flag, and from reading the Declaration of Independence to exploring your family tree, these activities will keep your children or students entertained while they learn.

    The photography in this book is outstanding. It is also obvious that Sanders put a great deal of effort and research into America’s Black Founders.  Classes that are studying Colonial America and Revolutionary times will definitely want to have this in their library. It is also a great read for Black History Month.

    I highly recommend America’s Black Founders by Nancy Sanders. You can find many more books by Sanders by checking out her website.

    Rating:  🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

  • Publisher: Chicago Review Press
  • ISBN-10: 1556528116
  • ISBN-13: 978-1556528118
  • SRP:  $16.95 


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    Celebrate Black History Month with a Good Book

    The Children’s and Teen’s Book Connection encourages you to celebrate Black History Month by selecting a few good books. Here are some of our picks!

    America’s Black Founders by Nancy I. Sanders

    Amazon.com description:  America’s Black Founders celebrates the lesser known but significant lives and contributions of our nation’s early African American leaders. Many know that the Revolutionary War’s first martyr, Crispus Attucks, a dockworker of African descent, was killed at the Boston Massacre. But far fewer know that the final conflict of the war, the Battle of Yorktown, was hastened to a conclusion by James Armistead Lafayette, a slave and spy who reported the battle plans of General Cornwallis to George Washington.

     
    Author Nancy Sanders weaves the histories of dozens of men and women—soldiers, sailors, ministers, poets, merchants, doctors, and other community leaders—who have earned proper recognition among the founders of the United States of America. To get a better sense of what these individuals accomplished and the times in which they lived, readers will celebrate Constitution Day, cook colonial foods, publish a newspaper, petition their government, and more. This valuable resource also includes a time line of significant events, a list of historic sites to visit or explore online, and Web resources for further study.
    Note: We will be reviewing this title at a later time.
     

    D is for Drinking Gourd: An African American Alphabet by Nancy I. Sanders

    Scholastic description:  A rich, poetic, alphabetical presentation of African-American history, including the Great Migration, the March on Washington, Malcolm X, and more.

    Also available at Amazon.com!

    The Day Martin Luther King, Jr. Was Shot: A Photo History of the Civil Rights Movement by Jim Haskins

    Scholastic description: A stirring look at the history of the fight for civil rights and the gains made since the fateful day of King’s death. With powerful photographs, illustrations, and more.

    Also available at Amazon.com!

    Cornerstones of Freedom: The Civil Rights Movement in America by Elaine Landau

    Scholastic description: Dramatic and defining moments in American history come vividly to life in this series designed to make children feel they are on the scene as history is being made. Through text, illustrations, photographs, and engravings, these titles support history, social studies and geography curricula. Index included.

    The history of slavery in the United States extends from 1619 to the Emancipation Proclamation, but the story of racial injustice is much longer. Relive the struggle against segregation and inequality from the Civil War through the Montgomery Bus Boycotts to the Voting Rights Act of 1965.

    Also available at Amazon.com!

    Not Afraid to Dare: The Stories of Ten African-American Women by Tonya Bolden

    Scholastic description:  Ellen Craft, Ida B. Wells, Toni Morrison – featured here are just a few of the African-American women who have enriched American life. Refusing to yield to discrimination and prejudice, these 10 women strove to be heard, to succeed, and to be free. Includes index and table of contents.

    Also available at Amazon.com!

    Dancing in the Wings by Debbie Allen 

    Scholastic description:  

    Sassy tries out for a summer dance festival in Washington, D.C., despite the other girls’ taunts that she is much too tall.

    Also available at Amazon.com!

    Note: This is by dancer and actor Debbie Allen known to people of my generation as the dance teacher from Fame (the movie and the series).  My oldest daughter borrowed this book from the school library numerous times. It has an excellent storyline and is very inspirational.



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